vitalpulse asked: Hello! I don't know you but I was looking at the recovery tag and I saw your post and I am sooo proud of you! I don't know all that you've been through or how bad things got but I am so glad that you are getting better and through it! Stay strong and don't ever give up and I believe in you! 🌷

Thank youuu <3

Anonymous asked: you're so beautiful and so proud of you bby (: almost made me year up a lil so happy

<333 :)

Also just (finally) mourned the death of a very close friend who died in February. I feel like shit. What even is the point of feelings if you don’t get to feel better after you go through feeling the gross ones?

  • No scales in my house
  • Fridge full of good plant-based food
  • Logged out of every nutrition tracking account
  • Deleted all nutrition tracking apps from phone
  • Put away the heart rate monitor 
  • Planning to sleep in tomorrow morning
  • Anxious as hell but I have to start somewhere.
thedragonflywarrior:

All right guys, this is it! “Find Your More” is happening.
Please like or reblog this photo if you plan on participating - I’d like to get a rough estimate of what to expect, and a signal boost would definitely help. (You can delete the text if you want to!)
For those who missed it, “Find Your More” is a personal project I’ve been working on that I’ve developed into a one-year challenge, and you’re all welcome to do this with me. This is not a weight loss or fitness challenge (although those things may factor into your outcome); it is a positive wellness and lifestyle challenge! If you choose to participate, it’s starting at the beginning of September. It will involve:
No calorie counting (unless for purely medical purposes).
No weighing yourself (see above).
A focus on whole foods from all food groups, mindful/intuitive eating, unbiased food education, and casual self-assessment to feel out what your own unique nutritional needs are to make your own unique body function ideally.
Learning to detach food from the concept of morality, eliminating the ideas of guilt/compensation/righteousness from the process of eating, and disengaging from other harmful societal values that exacerbate our culture’s general poor relationship with food and eating.
A focus on physical activity as an enjoyable way to make your body and mind feel good and work better, rather than solely as a method of altering physical appearance for superficial results.
Exploring different types and outlets of physical activity as a learning experience and to help yourself discover activities that you never considered, or that make you feel good, or that your own unique body might be especially suited to.
A focus on a manageably healthy lifestyle at any size or weight or shape. (A healthy body comes from a healthy lifestyle, but as a culture we seem to have gotten that mixed up.)
Making time for life experiences, learning and trying new things, and allowing flexibility within a healthy and moderate lifestyle.
Disengaging from the good body/bad body binary. All bodies are good bodies, including yours. Learning to walk away from the cultural values that sell you things to change yourself, and learning to be accepting of all physical choices and appreciative of all bodies, including your own.
A focus on daily positivity, even if it’s small. Share a thing from your day that you feel was beneficial to your overall, long-term wellness.
Everything is 100% voluntary and very unstructured. This is not a “program”. There are no lists, timetables, numbers, or specific meal plans. 
See where you are in one year.
This is a challenge designed to break the cycle of diet culture and disordered relationships with food and exercise. We can live well and be healthy without measuring, obsessing, or buying into things that tell us we are not good enough. We are all more than our bodies, our weights, and our measurements. Whatever your “more” might be… let’s go find it. &lt;3
(Please tag your related posts with #findyourmore or #find your more so I can see them!)

Sorry for the radio silence on this, but I&#8217;m running forward with this starting on Monday!
Again guys, this is a super unstructured thing. At the very least, I&#8217;ll be posting weekly prompts and/or challenges. It&#8217;s your choice whether to participate or not.
This challenge will incorporate everything related to positive lifestyles, health and wellness, and personal growth.
Again, it will not involve measurements - no calories, weighing, or counting. Scary, yes, but a challenge worth trying for.
The idea that progress is only worth making if it can be specifically measured in numbers is an idea we (as individuals and as a culture) HAVE to get away from. It is distorted and counterproductive. Anyone who has experience with chronic dieting or structured &#8220;programs&#8221; can probably tell you that focusing on only the numbers does nothing but sell us a flawed perspective on health/bodies and fail to teach us the life tools we need to develop real, permanent, positive, functional health and wellness skills.
Let&#8217;s get away from that. Let&#8217;s learn to value non-scale victories and performance achievements and beautiful healthy unmeasured meals and feeling good when we wake up in the morning. Let&#8217;s learn to love exercise and the outdoors and feeling fast and strong and getting a new skill or sport without wondering how many calories the heart rate monitor says. Let&#8217;s ditch the whole &#8220;burn it to earn it&#8221; and endless sessions at that gym you secretly hate and beating yourself up when you skip a workout and analyzing every bite of food to make sure it&#8217;s &#8220;clean&#8221;. 
I want to eat beautiful meals instead of an unsatisfying plate of calculated macronutrients. I want to have an enjoyable fitness routine that improves me as a whole person and workouts that are good because I got better at something, not because I burned xxx calories doing it.
I want to have a life instead of numbers. That&#8217;s why I&#8217;m doing this.
If you&#8217;re on board, that&#8217;s wonderful and I&#8217;m so glad to have you. If you want to start but you don&#8217;t feel ready, that&#8217;s fine too, jump on board whenever you feel it&#8217;s your time.

thedragonflywarrior:

All right guys, this is it! “Find Your More” is happening.

Please like or reblog this photo if you plan on participating - I’d like to get a rough estimate of what to expect, and a signal boost would definitely help. (You can delete the text if you want to!)

For those who missed it, “Find Your More” is a personal project I’ve been working on that I’ve developed into a one-year challenge, and you’re all welcome to do this with me. This is not a weight loss or fitness challenge (although those things may factor into your outcome); it is a positive wellness and lifestyle challenge! If you choose to participate, it’s starting at the beginning of September. It will involve:

  • No calorie counting (unless for purely medical purposes).
  • No weighing yourself (see above).
  • A focus on whole foods from all food groups, mindful/intuitive eating, unbiased food education, and casual self-assessment to feel out what your own unique nutritional needs are to make your own unique body function ideally.
  • Learning to detach food from the concept of morality, eliminating the ideas of guilt/compensation/righteousness from the process of eating, and disengaging from other harmful societal values that exacerbate our culture’s general poor relationship with food and eating.
  • A focus on physical activity as an enjoyable way to make your body and mind feel good and work better, rather than solely as a method of altering physical appearance for superficial results.
  • Exploring different types and outlets of physical activity as a learning experience and to help yourself discover activities that you never considered, or that make you feel good, or that your own unique body might be especially suited to.
  • A focus on a manageably healthy lifestyle at any size or weight or shape. (A healthy body comes from a healthy lifestyle, but as a culture we seem to have gotten that mixed up.)
  • Making time for life experiences, learning and trying new things, and allowing flexibility within a healthy and moderate lifestyle.
  • Disengaging from the good body/bad body binary. All bodies are good bodies, including yours. Learning to walk away from the cultural values that sell you things to change yourself, and learning to be accepting of all physical choices and appreciative of all bodies, including your own.
  • A focus on daily positivity, even if it’s small. Share a thing from your day that you feel was beneficial to your overall, long-term wellness.
  • Everything is 100% voluntary and very unstructured. This is not a “program”. There are no lists, timetables, numbers, or specific meal plans. 
  • See where you are in one year.

This is a challenge designed to break the cycle of diet culture and disordered relationships with food and exercise. We can live well and be healthy without measuring, obsessing, or buying into things that tell us we are not good enough. We are all more than our bodies, our weights, and our measurements. Whatever your “more” might be… let’s go find it. <3

(Please tag your related posts with #findyourmore or #find your more so I can see them!)

Sorry for the radio silence on this, but I’m running forward with this starting on Monday!

Again guys, this is a super unstructured thing. At the very least, I’ll be posting weekly prompts and/or challenges. It’s your choice whether to participate or not.

This challenge will incorporate everything related to positive lifestyles, health and wellness, and personal growth.

Again, it will not involve measurements - no calories, weighing, or counting. Scary, yes, but a challenge worth trying for.

The idea that progress is only worth making if it can be specifically measured in numbers is an idea we (as individuals and as a culture) HAVE to get away from. It is distorted and counterproductive. Anyone who has experience with chronic dieting or structured “programs” can probably tell you that focusing on only the numbers does nothing but sell us a flawed perspective on health/bodies and fail to teach us the life tools we need to develop real, permanent, positive, functional health and wellness skills.

Let’s get away from that. Let’s learn to value non-scale victories and performance achievements and beautiful healthy unmeasured meals and feeling good when we wake up in the morning. Let’s learn to love exercise and the outdoors and feeling fast and strong and getting a new skill or sport without wondering how many calories the heart rate monitor says. Let’s ditch the whole “burn it to earn it” and endless sessions at that gym you secretly hate and beating yourself up when you skip a workout and analyzing every bite of food to make sure it’s “clean”. 

I want to eat beautiful meals instead of an unsatisfying plate of calculated macronutrients. I want to have an enjoyable fitness routine that improves me as a whole person and workouts that are good because I got better at something, not because I burned xxx calories doing it.

I want to have a life instead of numbers. That’s why I’m doing this.

If you’re on board, that’s wonderful and I’m so glad to have you. If you want to start but you don’t feel ready, that’s fine too, jump on board whenever you feel it’s your time.

patricktales:

The Capoeira is an Afro-Brazilian martial art with dance-like acrobatic movements that are combined with music and song. It is originates from the arrival of slaves in Brazil from Africa during the Portuguese colonization in the 16th century; it was forbidden to them to be trained for fights so the slaves camouflaged their practices behind the song, the music and the movements of dance.

Started a 20-class round of capoeira today (I’ve got a couple local fitness passes from Groupon that are really cool). Undoubtedly the most challenging new thing I’ve tried in awhile. It was like getting dance, fighting, cool music, and a very important history lesson all in one. I definitely want to know more.

toiletpeanutbutter asked: Hey, Jess. I'm trying incredibly hard to get in to shape. Ideally, lose 30 lbs, keep it off, and stay active. The hardest parts for me are: how to stay motivated and uncertainty as to if I'm doing it right. Any advice you'd wanna give me would be helpful.

toiletpeanutbutter -

Hey. Yeah, loss of motivation and uncertainty have really been my biggest obstacles as well. I sympathize with this, completely.

The most important thing to keep in perspective though, is that no one just finds a motivation and confidence “on/off” switch. No one is 100% “on” or super motivated/confident all the time. You take it step by step, and there are always setbacks and frustrations. But any obstacle shouldn’t be looked at as something huge and negative in the way of your progress… obstacles are a natural part of progress. You don’t make lasting, positive, personal progress if there aren’t obstacles.

On the subject of motivation, I always remember that Jim Wendler quote: "FIND A REAL REASON to train, not something that is cosmetic. Vikings never gave a shit how they looked when they swung the axe, only that the axe landed hard and with purpose." I’m not saying that your goals are cosmetic, rather I am urging you to make meaningful goals and put in the work to achieve them. Instead of setting a weight goal for yourself as the primary focus, might you consider something profound and functional that you want to accomplish for your life? Do you want to run faster, lift heavier weights, eat more nutritious food, get better at a sport, sleep better at night, feel happier and smarter? Pick a meaningful goal and put your efforts towards it. I find that focusing specifically on (scale) weight loss can be counterproductive to health goals, as the food tracking/calorie counting can often prevent the body from receiving the nutrition it needs to meet athletic goals or make physical improvements. I will be the first to say that losing spare body fat is a perfectly respectable goal if you choose to pursue it, but it is counterproductive to body and life to make scale weight a big focus when working on an achievement-based goal will most likely result in losing some extra fat on its own.

Everything I have to say about “doing it right” is similar to what I’ve already written. It has to be slow, otherwise you are weakening your body and losing lean tissue instead of spare fat. If your goal is to keep it off, give yourself time to achieve your goal (a year?) and consider making a functional fitness goal to help encourage you to get into health, not just weight loss. Perform activities that strengthen and improve you, and then eat to fuel those activities, and then rest. Always think of yourself getting stronger (by training and eating), and never weaken your metabolism (by working out and then restricting food). Consider what foods and activities you enjoy doing, or some things that you’ve wanted to try, and see if you can incorporate those activities and recipes into a more nutritious and active lifestyle. If it feels unnatural, it probably is. If you’re hungry, eat something nutritious. If you’re tired or in pain, take a rest. If it seems overly expensive, it probably is, and if it seems overly complicated, it probably is. Simplify. If you’re getting impatient, take a breath and try to be kind to yourself. If you’re bored or angry or depressed in your workouts, find something that you like better. Most of all, try to work health and fitness into your life. It doesn’t have to BE your life. Don’t burn yourself out.

the-iron-angel:

The Great  Abbye “Pudgy” Stockton - 1917 - 2006

(via sunandstrength)

Delicious gourmet dinner! Kale, walnut, and cranberry salad with baby red potatoes and the last of my cottage cheese. Perf!

Delicious gourmet dinner! Kale, walnut, and cranberry salad with baby red potatoes and the last of my cottage cheese. Perf!

One of those grocery store checkout line situations where nothing needs to be said&#8230;.

(The cashier gave me a sympathetic smile and wished me &#8220;an extra nice day.&#8221;)

One of those grocery store checkout line situations where nothing needs to be said….

(The cashier gave me a sympathetic smile and wished me “an extra nice day.”)

allmymetaphors:

as a girl, loving yrself isn’t just cool and positive for daily life, but it’s also very political. companies and laws and social standards don’t advocate self-love for women. it’s Abnormal and it might seem like a little thing to do but it’s actually crucial. keep up the good work gals :~)

(via sunandstrength)

thedragonflywarrior:

Hella awesome vegetarian/vegan stir fry!*

Ingredients (amounts vary, depending on how hungry you are):

  • 2-3 oz soba noodles (dry)
  • 4-8 oz extra firm tofu or mock duck
  • 1 can or 2 cups baby corn
  • Tons of broccoli
  • 1 oz whole or sliced almonds or peanuts
  • 1 tbsp soy sauce
  • 1 tbsp lime juice or rice vinegar
  • Peanut butter (to taste)
  • 1 tbsp honey
  • 1 clove of garlic
  • 1 tsp fresh ginger

To make:

  1. Cook your soba noodles. Set them aside to cool.
  2. Chop your veggies, protein, and nuts.
  3. In a small bowl, mix 1 tbsp soy sauce, lime juice, ginger and garlic. Add 1/2 cup of water and stir thoroughly.
  4. In a large nonstick skillet, heat 1-2 tsp of sesame oil on medium high. Lightly fry your choice of protein until slightly browned.
  5. Add your vegetables and nuts to the skillet, and pour the pre-mixed sauce over the top of everything. Cover the pan and let it steam for 3-5 minutes.
  6. In a small bowl, mix peanut butter, 1 tbsp soy sauce and honey. Add a drizzle of water and blend until smooth. Pour it over the noodles and mix together.
  7. Check your skillet! If the broccoli is at least partially well-steamed, remove the cover to let the steam out.
  8. Turn the stir-fry in the skillet with a spatula to cook it evenly. With the heat on high, let it sizzle until it is browned to your taste.
  9. Add to noodles and enjoy!

*Please note: This is a vegetarian OR vegan dish depending on what type of carb or protein you choose. Some fake meats can still contain small amounts of animal product, and some types of soba noodles are made with egg. For vegans, I advise sticking with rice/rice noodles and tofu/seitan.

(Source: tumblr.com)

accordingtorhia replied to your post: I’m not going to claim “vegan” as a la…

While I agree with your sentiments about not commenting on other people’s diets, that’s kinda what you’re doing when you say vegans think eating animals is “wrong.” Not all vegans think that. I know many vegans that do it for health reasons, not morals.

But if you look up any number of vegan societies, something they all have in common is the statement that only eating a 100% plant-based diet is NOT enough to make you actually vegan. That being a vegan means you adopt the philosophies and moral standpoints, not just the abstinence from any animal products. So, from that point of view, people who are eat vegan diets for health reasons are not in fact “real vegans” for the fact that they don’t directly oppose the use of animal products. There seems to be a lot of very picky and conflicting info.